Sunday, November 11, 2012

Upcoming in November on Fieldstone Common Radio

Be sure to mark your calendar. We'll be giving away some great books during the live broadcasts of Fieldstone Common.

1 Nov 2012 at 1pm EST
When America First Met China by Eric Jay Dolin on Fieldstone Common

When America First Met China with Eric Jay Dolin. As a brand new country the United States set out right away to establish itself as a commercial power. Eric Jay Dolin talks about the early roots of the China trade and the historical balance of power between these two nations.

8 Nov 2012 at 1pm EST
Mahogany by Prof. Jennifer L. Anderson on Fieldstone Common

Mahogany: The Costs of Luxury in Early America with Prof. Jennifer L. Anderson. In the mid-eighteenth century, colonial Americans became enamored with the rich colors and silky surface of mahogany. Mahogany traces the path of this wood through many hands, from source to sale: from the enslaved African woodcutters, to the ship captains, merchants, and timber dealers.

15 Nov 2012 at 1pm EST
The Poorhouses of Massachusetts by Heli Meltsner on Fieldstone Common
The Poorhouses of Massachusetts with Heli Meltsner.  A Study on the development of the poorhouses, the life within their walls and their architecture. Learn how Massachusetts dealt with its poor, homeless and mentally ill before the inception of Social Security and current welfare programs.
22 Nov 2012 at 1pm EST
Plimoth Plantation Culinarian Kathleen Wall on Fieldstone Common
An Original Thanksgiving with Plimouth Plantation Culinarian, Kathleen Wall. What was the original Thanksgiving like and how does it compare with how we celebrate today? Learn about colonial food in this very special Thanksgiving episode.
29 Nov 2012 at 1pm EST
Professor Ken Lockridge on Fieldstone Common

A New England Town with Prof. Ken Lockridge . Ken Lockridge wrote A New England Town in 1970 and it went on to become a significant contribution to the field of history and our understanding of the development of New England. Come hear how the field of history has changed since that time.

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