Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Listen Direct from iTunes!

Did you know that you can download Fieldstone Common episodes directly into iTunes?!!

On your iPhone go to the App Store or in iTunes on your computer go to the iTunes Store.

In the search box type "Fieldstone Common" (click to enlarge photo) and then press enter. (These images show the computer version of iTunes.)


Next, the Fieldstone Common podcast will appear on your screen. You'll see all the episodes available for download.

Then click the Subscribe Free button and the podcast will automatically be downloaded to your computer or iPhone.


You only have to subscribe once. After that all future episodes will be made available to you.


To listen click on the podcast button and choose the episode you want to listen to.  Now you'll have Fieldstone Common with you whenever you're on the go!


Monday, October 29, 2012

Show Notes - Murdered by His Wife with Deborah Navas

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 25 October 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with Deborah Navas, author of Murdered by His Wife: An absorbing tale of crime and punishment in eighteenth-century Massachusetts.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can learn more about Deborah Navas and Murdered by His Wife from her author website.

Murdered by His Wife was published by the University of Massachusetts Press and copies are available for sale through Amazon.com and other booksellers.

I first learned about the Bathsheba Spooner story from a feature "Brookfield Woman Put to Death" on the Mass Moments website which provides a moment in Massachusetts history each day. You can sign up to receive the Mass Moments via email every day.  They also have a Facebook page.

You can read a summary of Bathsheba Spooner's life and trial on Wikipedia.

During the interview, Deborah Navas mentioned wall drawings of the trial that were created at the time of the trial. You can read more about them at the West Boylston, Massachusetts historical society website.

The American Antiquarian Society published an article in 1889 by Samuel Swett Green entitled "The Case of Bathsheba Spooner."  The article is available online via the Open Collections Program at Harvard University.  You can access this same article via Archives.org.

Revolutionary War historian J.L. Bell wrote a blog post about Bathsheba Spooner which contains links to more details about many of the players (such as Bathsheba's father, Timothy Ruggles and prosecutor Robert Treat Paine).

Deborah Navas is working on a fictional account of the story in the form of a novel likely to be titled Bathsheba Spooner which should be released in 2013.

The University of Massachusetts Press, the publisher of Murdered by His Wife, donated one copy of the book that was given as a door prize during the live show. A big thank you to the the University of Massachusetts Press for  their generosity!



Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Sunday, October 28, 2012

When America First Met China with Eric Jay Dolin

Eric Jay Dolin author of When America First Met China
Eric Jay Dolin
LIVE: THURSDAY, 1 November 2012 at 1:00pm EST

Listen in to Fieldstone Common this week as host Marian Pierre-Louis talks to Eric Jay Dolin, author of When America First Met China.

Brilliantly illuminating one of the least understood areas of American history, bestselling author Eric Jay Dolin now traces our fraught relationship with China back to its roots: the unforgiving nineteenth-century seas that separated a brash, rising naval power from a battered ancient empire.

It is a prescient fable for our time, one that surprisingly continues to shed light on our modern relationship with China. Indeed, the furious trade in furs, opium, and bĂȘche-de-mer-a rare sea cucumber delicacy-might have catalyzed America's emerging economy, but it also sparked an ecological and human rights catastrophe of such epic proportions, the reverberations can still be felt today.

Peopled with fascinating characters-from the "Financier of the Revolution" Robert Morris to the Chinese emperor Qianlong, who considered foreigners inferior beings-When America First Met China is a page-turning saga that explores a time many years ago when the desire for trade and profit first brought America to China's door. 

Much of Dolin’s writing reflects his interest in wildlife, the environment, and American history. His books include Fur, Fortune, and Empire: The Epic History of the Fur Trade in America (W. W. Norton), Leviathan: The History of Whaling in America (W. W. Norton), the Smithsonian Book of National Wildlife Refuges, Snakehead: A Fish Out of Water, and Political Waters, a history of the degradation and cleanup of Boston Harbor. Leviathan was chosen as one of the best nonfiction books of 2007 by the Los Angeles Times, the Boston Globe, and the Providence Journal.
Dolin and his family reside in Marblehead, Massachusetts.





Thursday, October 25, 2012

Murdered by His Wife Now Available as a Podcast

Fieldstone Common podcast 10-25-12 www.blogtalkradio.com/fieldstonecommon
by Derrickkwa
The most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring author Deborah Navas speaking about her book Murdered by His Wife is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).





Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Victim or Villain - Can We Sympathize with Bathsheba Spooner?

Murdered by His Wife by Deborah Navas
Murdered by His Wife
by Deborah Navas
Today on Fieldstone Common we will be talking about a true tale of 18th century mayhem and murder. But it's not a simple, clear cut tale. The story is complex and the backdrop of the American Revolution adds extenuating circumstances.

I want to hear from 
Fieldstone Common listeners!

Should Bathsheba Spooner have been spared?

Was she a cold and calculating murderer?

Did her husband deserve to die?

Should we feel sympathy for the men she convinced to commit the murder?

Is this a tale of the role of women in society or about one woman's privilege and economic status?

Did the passionate ties to loyalist or patriotic sentiment seal the fate of Bathsheba?

Listen live at 1pm EST or to the replay in the archive afterward and let us know what you think!

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

In Death Lamented - Now thru January 31

In Death Lamented exhibit at the  Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston, MA
In Death Lamented exhibit at the
Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston, MA
In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry 17th to 19th Centuries is a current exhibit at the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston, Massachusetts. The exhibit explores the way memorial jewelry was worn through the centuries.

Marian Pierre-Louis will be discussing the exhibit with curator Sarah Nehama during the January 3, 2013 episode of Fieldstone Common.

The exhibit runs from now until January 31, 2013.  Instead of waiting for the Fieldstone Common show, go see the exhibit now. See first hand all the pieces that Sarah Nehama will be discussing.

I'll be heading over in November to see it myself. Drop me a line if you'd like would like to join me.

Saturday, October 20, 2012

Murdered by His Wife with Deborah Navas


LIVE: THURSDAY, 25 OCTOBER 2012 at 1:00pm EST

Listen in to Fieldstone Common this week as host Marian Pierre-Louis talks to Deborah Navas, author of Murdered by His Wife.

In March 1778, Joshua Spooner, a wealthy gentleman farmer in Brookfield, Massachusetts, was beaten to death and his body stuffed down a well. Four people were hanged for the crime: two British soldiers, a young Continental soldier, and Spooner's wife, Bathsheba, who was charged with instigating the murder. She was thirty-two years old and five months pregnant when executed. Newspapers described the case as "the most extraordinary crime ever perpetrated in New England."

Murdered by His Wife provides a vivid reconstruction of this dramatic but little-known episode. Beautiful, intelligent, high-spirited, and witty, Bathsheba was the mother of three young children and in her own words felt "an utter aversion" for her husband, who was known to be an abusive drunk.

The plots, the crime, the trial, and the aftermath are presented against a backdrop of revolutionary turmoil in Massachusetts. As the daughter of the state's most prominent and despised Loyalist, Bathsheba bore the brunt of the political, cultural, and gender prejudices of her day. When she sought a stay of execution to deliver her baby, the Massachusetts Council rejected her petition and she was promptly hanged before a crowd of 5,000 spectators.

An independent scholar, Deborah Navas worked as a magazine editor for twenty years. She is author of a short story collection, Things We Lost, Gave Away, Bought High and Sold Low, and won the PEN Syndicated Fiction Award and the New Hampshire Writers Project Emerging Writer Award.





Show Notes - Witchcraft Prosecution With Richard Tomlinson

Richard G. Tomlinson, author of Witchcraft Prosecution
Richard G. Tomlinson
Following are some items that were mentioned during the 18 October 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with Richard G. Tomlinson, author of Witchcraft Prosecution: Chasing the Devil in Connecticut.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can learn more about Richard G. Tomlinson and Witchcraft Prosecution from his author website.

Witchcraft Prosecution: Chasing the Devil in Connecticut was published by Picton Press and copies are available for sale through the Connecticut Society of Genealogists.  At this point it's not available on Amazon.com.

Information about the Samuel Wyllys Papers, 1668-1728 is available from the Connecticut State Library. The collection includes a helpful finding aid.

Brown University also has a collection of the Wyllys (Samuel) papers, 1638-1757.

The Connecticut State Library has information about Colony of Connecticut Governor, John Winthrop, Jr.


Press Press, the publisher of Witchcraft Prosecution: Chasing the Devil in Connecticut, donated two copies that were given as a door prizes during the live show. A big thank you to the Picton Press for  their generosity!



Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Friday, October 19, 2012

Witchcraft Prosecution Now Archived as a Podcast

by Derrickkwa
The most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring author Richard G. Tomlinson speaking about his book Witchcraft Prosecution: Chasing the Devil in Connecticut is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).




Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Saturday, October 13, 2012

Witchcraft Prosecution with Richard G. Tomlinson

Richard G. Tomlinson
LIVE: THURSDAY, 18 OCTOBER 2012 at 1:00pm EST

Listen in to Fieldstone Common this week as host Marian Pierre-Louis talks to Richard G. Tomlinson, author of Witchcraft Prosecution: Chasing the Devil in Connecticut.

Mercy Disbrow was convicted. A date was set for her hanging. An appeal was made. Then something extraordinary happened. Mercy was granted a reprieve that became a pardon, because of a technical error in the composition of the jury. The court said, "If a real and apparent murderer be condemned and executed outside of due form of law, it is indictable against them that do it." The place was Hartford, Connecticut. The offense was witchcraft. The year was 1693.

Connecticut's colonial settlers feared witches. They came from an England where the prosecution of witches was rising to its peak, and they were anxious about the possible threats to their new settlements that witchcraft might represent. This book presents the evolution of witchcraft prosecution in Connecticut from the enactment of the law making it a capital offence in 1642 to its disappearance in the early 1700s.

Richard G. Tomlinson, is a founder and director of the Connecticut Society of Genealogists, Inc. (www.csginc.org) and currently serves as Chair of the Publication Committee and as vice president. He created the annual CSG Literary Awards for Genealogy and Family History, and the CSG magazine, Connecticut Genealogy News, and has published many genealogical and family history articles.

He is a contributing author to several scientific and technical books and the author of three histories including Witchcraft Trials of Connecticut and Tele-Revolution, A history of the creation of a competitive telecommunications industry 1984-2000. Picton Press released his latest book, Witchcraft Prosecution, Chasing the Devil in Connecticut, in August 2012. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Connecticut Historical Society. He is a descendant of Henry Tomlinson of Derby, England who settled in Milford, CT in 1650.

Friday, October 12, 2012

Show Notes - Sleepy Hollow with Jonathan Kruk

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 11 October 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with storyteller Jonathan Kruk, author of The Legends and Lore of Sleepy Hollow and the Hudson Valley.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Jonathan Kruk's book the Legends and Lore of Sleepy Hollow and the Hudson Valley is available from Amazon.com and other books sellers. For an autographed copy of Jonathan's book please order through his website.

Learn more about Jonathan Kruk from his website and follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

In July 2013, Jonathan's second book, The Legends and Lore of the Hudson Highlands, will be published by the History Press.

One of Jonathan's current projects is to provide content for the historical research subscription site BiblioLabs.

Jonathan Kruk has recorded many of his Sleepy Hollow and Hudson Valley tales for digital listening. You can find them on Amazon.com.

He also gives many presentations to school and organizations. You can find information about his programs and book one through his website.



The History Press, the publisher of Legends and Lore of Sleepy Hollow and the Hudson Valley, donated two copies that were given as a door prizes during the live show. A big thank you to the History Press for  their generosity!


Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Thursday, October 11, 2012

The Legends & Lore of Sleepy Hollow is Now Archived as a Podcast

The Legends & Lore of Sleepy Hollow is Now Archived as a Podcast
by Derrickkwa
The most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring storyteller Jonathan Kruk speaking about his book The Legends and Lore of Sleepy Hollow and the Hudson Valley is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).




Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Saturday, October 6, 2012

The Legends and Lore of Sleepy Hollow with Jonathan Kruk

Author and storyteller Jonathan Kruk
photo by Todd Atteberry
Listen in to Fieldstone Common this week as host Marian Pierre-Louis talks to Jonathan Kruk, author of Legends and Lore of Sleepy Hollow and the Hudson Valley.

Washington Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is one of the best-known works of American literature. But what other myths lie hidden behind the landscape of New York's Hudson Valley? Imps cause mischief on the Hudson River; a white lady haunts Raven Rock, Major Andre's ghost seeks redemption and real headless Hessians search for their severed skulls. Storyteller Jonathan Kruk tells these and other tales of the lore of the Hudson Valley--the stories that have created an atmosphere of mystery that helped inspire Irving's legend.

Studying English, and educational theater, Kruk earned a B.A. from Holy Cross College, and a M.A. from New York University. He performed Ritual Urban Theater with Gabrielle Roth, and entertained at over 1000 children’s birthday parties. The Freeport Schools on Long Island made him storyteller in residence. Now, he enchants children every year at hundreds of schools, libraries, historic sites and festivals performing finger fables, story theater and New York lore.

His book Legends and Lore of Sleepy Hollow and the Hudson Valley was published in 2011 by The History Press. He has keynoted for New York State reading teachers, environmental educators, national native plants conference, and the Hudson River Quadricentennial, and American Revolution’s 225th anniversary.

LIVE: THURSDAY, 11 OCTOBER 2012 at 1:00pm EST

Show Notes - Final Thoughts with John Thomas Grant

Following are some notes on items that were mentioned during the 4 October 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with photographer John Thomas Grant, author of Final Thoughts: Eternal Beauty in Stone.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can learn more about John Thomas Grant at his website and you can follow him on his blog, Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

John is involved a joint business venture called The Passion Projects with Lisa Griffiths. 

John and Lisa are both busy working on upcoming books.

Lisa will be publishing International Steampunk Fashions in January 2013 and another called The Fashionable Victorians and Edwardians.

John and Lisa are also working on a television show called All Things Victorian.

John is working on a number of projects including two civil war books - one which is a collection of civil war letters and the other on a 12 year old civil war soldier.  He also has in the works two more cemetery photography books called The  American Cemetery and  Death in Color.

John currently is exhibiting in two Gallery Shows:

The Cahoon Museum of American Art
4676 Falmouth Road
Cotuit, Massachusetts
Exhibiting until Oct. 28, 2012

The Vanover Fine Arts Gallery
49 East Main Street
Springville, New York
Exhibiting until Nov. 3, 2012

Schiffer Books, the publisher of Final Thoughts: Eternal Beauty in Stone, donated a copy that was given as a door prize during the live show. A big thank you to Schiffer Books for  their generosity!

Press play below to listen to the podcast.


Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Thursday, October 4, 2012

Final Thoughts with John Thomas Grant is Now a Podcast

Final Thoughts with John Thomas Grant now available as a podcast
by Derrickkwa
The most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring photographer John Thomas Grant speaking about his book Final Thoughts: Eternal Beauty in Stone is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).




Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Upcoming in October on Fieldstone Common Radio

Be sure to mark your calendar. We'll be giving away some great books during the live broadcasts of Fieldstone Common.

4 Oct 2012 at 1pm EST

Final Thought: Eternal Beauty in Stone with John Thomas Grant. John interprets and connects with history through the camera lens. He reminds us that the past resides with us, sometimes forgotten and sometimes celebrated.  Join us as we talk with John Thomas Grant about his book, Final Thoughts.

11 Oct 2012 at 1pm EST

Legends and Lore of Sleepy Hollow and the Hudson Valley with Jonathan Kruk. Beyond Sleepy Hollow are tales of an imp that causes mischief, a white lady that haunts Ravens Rock and the ghost of Major Andre. Storyteller Jonathan Kruk shares the lore of the Hudson Valley.

18 Oct 2012 at 1pm EST


Witchcraft Prosecution: Chasing the Devil in Connecticut with Richard G. Tomlinson.  Connecticut's colonial settlers feared witches. In England where the prosecution of witches was rising to its peak, and they were anxious about the possible threats to their new settlements that witchcraft might represent. Dick Tomlinson presents the evolution of witchcraft prosecution in Connecticut from 1642 to its disappearance in the early 1700s.
25Oct 2012 at 1pm EST

Murdered by His Wife with Deborah NavasIn March 1778, Joshua Spooner, a wealthy gentleman farmer was beaten to death and his body stuffed down a well. Four people were hanged for the crime: two British soldiers, a young Continental soldier, and Spooner's wife, Bathsheba, who was charged with instigating the murder.Come hear a story of 18th century murder.